Dear Lebanese Homophobes

When Lebanon’s Government agencies are too coward to uphold the constitution and protect the LGBTQ community, brave voices stand up for equal rights! Thank you Elie Fares!

A Separate State of Mind | A Blog by Elie Fares

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Over the past week or so, I’ve had the honor to write about two major advances for the LGBTQI+ community in Lebanon. The first was them being represented in an ad for a major company, which you could check out here, and the second was to proclaim how Beirut is the first Arab city ever to celebrate Pride Week, despite Islamists threatening one of its events eventually leading to that one event’s cancellation (link).

Nevertheless, they persisted.

On those posts, be it in the comment section or on my Facebook page, the amount of vitriol homophobic – or more globally LGBTQI+ vomit although homosexuality takes the cake in aversion – was just too ignorant and insurmountable to be addressed in Facebook comments that could, sooner or later, degenerate into shouting rows…

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Winning the Eisenhower Fellowship, an honor and a responsibility

I am getting ready for an exciting two-month journey with the Eisenhower Fellowships, Women Leaders Program 2015 which will take me to Philadelphia, Washington DC, New York, Boston, Sedona, San Francisco, Seattle, Los Angeles, and Miami. Like my explorer ancestors, I will be touring the US's top local and international organizations, public and UN institutions,… Continue reading Winning the Eisenhower Fellowship, an honor and a responsibility

Special report: Lebanese-Brazilians

A beautiful and well-researched piece by Joe Dyke documenting the Lebanese migration to Brazil from the late 1800s till today... Published in the Executive Magazine, July 2014

Syrian Refugees in Lebanon: Is Anybody Listening?

The International Community, the US, EU and the UN commend Lebanon for being cooperative and receiving more Syrian Refugees while allies of the EU and the US such as Jordan and Turkey have taken a clear position towards closing their borders in consideration of their national security and incapacity of managing the what we know now is going to be a long crisis with no ends or solutions any time soon.
Yes, Lebanon is commanded for being collaborative, but in reality it is commanded for being weak and unable to take a firm position toward a crisis that should be the responsibility of the International Community and not just that of the 4 million Lebanese.
If the international Community is REALLY concerned about the Syrian Refugees safety and security, they have two options: either provide them with the needed 400 million dollars monthly to ensure their bare survival in Lebanon or host them in their own countries. But to push Lebanon to receive more refugees and to refrain from providing them with support, then accuse Lebanese of xenophobia and racism is pure hypocrisy!

What alarms me the most is that I am seeing more xenophobia among the most liberal of the Lebanese civil society, simply because what is happening is just inflicting worry and hardship to all Lebanese throughout Lebanon. What is even more alarming are the hypocritical comments of some NGO leaders who are benefiting from the donations and support given to the Syrian Refugees and who continue to mislead the international community about the reality of the situation on the ground. This is the beginning of a crisis which will impact seriously Israel’s security too. Maybe then the international community will look at it more seriously…

The below article from Eye on the East says it all. Please take a moment to read it!

Eye on the East

Talking about the growing, or rather alarming, number of Syrians that have sought refuge in Lebanon since 2012 is very tricky. There is a very fine line between the humanitarian aspect of the issue and racism and intolerance, from a population that should know more than anyone else, the meaning of war and the pain of having to leave one’s home behind.

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Lebanon censors films over homosexuality and temporary marriage

#Lebanon censors films over #homosexuality and temporary#marriage. Lebanese #government and officials keep proving their bipolar nature: Lebanon cannot claim to be a#democratic country when we keep #discriminating against a big portion of our society and that extends to the #LGBTcommunity, #women, #children, #domestic #workers,#minorities! We live these realities, we enjoy them, yet we refuse to talk about them! what kind of stupidity is this? Gay Rights are Human Rights! Wake… Continue reading Lebanon censors films over homosexuality and temporary marriage

Sharing my experience of leadership in Local Government

I am getting ready to go to Morocco at the invitation of the Anna Lindh Foundation (ALF) President Mr. Andre Azoulay, Advisor to His Majesty Mohammed VI, King of Morocco, to be one of the 5 main speakers who will discuss the resources and mechanisms of participation of youth in local decision making and local governments at the… Continue reading Sharing my experience of leadership in Local Government

Les immigrés syro-libanais au Brésil de 1920 à 1926: Perception du corps consulaire français

The International Conference on Arab Immigration in the Americas Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS) September 28 – October 1st, 2005   Les immigrés syro-libanais au Brésil de 1920 à 1926: Perception du corps consulaire français   Eliane N. FERSAN   © 2005 All rights reserved. No part of this paper may be… Continue reading Les immigrés syro-libanais au Brésil de 1920 à 1926: Perception du corps consulaire français

Lebanese Migration (1880–Present): “Push” and “Pull” Factors

Lebanese Migration (1880–Present): “Push” and “Pull” Factors (published in Viewpoints Special Edition, Migration and the Mashreq, The Middle East Institute – Washington DC, April 2010, pp. 13 – 17.) Middle East Institute, Washington DC The earliest traces of modern Syro-Lebanese[1] migration date to the 1850s with Anthonius Al-Bishalani, who migrated to the United States. However, scholars consider the… Continue reading Lebanese Migration (1880–Present): “Push” and “Pull” Factors