An example of what is at stake in this election 

The Montana incest/rape victim did not receive justice because the minor child, violated by her own father, could not find anyone to speak in her favor. Not even her own mother, who pleaded the judge to have mercy on the rapist because his two sons needed him.To say that the judge gave the rapist a… Continue reading An example of what is at stake in this election 

Orlando Massacre: Hate, Extremism and Gun Proliferation

I am infuriated about this atrocious act of hate in ‪#‎Orlando‬ ‪#‎Florida‬ and concerned about retaliation and escalation of violence and hate against both the LGBT and Muslim communities. Let me be clear, hate and discrimination against the LGBT community is a common practice of bigots of all faiths, it is not foreign to the… Continue reading Orlando Massacre: Hate, Extremism and Gun Proliferation

Why Hillary’s win is important to girls, women around the world

Observing and talking to different people the past few days, I could not help this reflection: mothers and parents of girls are more likely to appreciate the historic moment of Hillary Clinton's nomination than mothers/parents of boys. It seems that, mothers in particular, need to be reminded of all the things they were told they… Continue reading Why Hillary’s win is important to girls, women around the world

Special report: Lebanese-Brazilians

A beautiful and well-researched piece by Joe Dyke documenting the Lebanese migration to Brazil from the late 1800s till today... Published in the Executive Magazine, July 2014

Lebanese Migration (1880–Present): “Push” and “Pull” Factors

Lebanese Migration (1880–Present): “Push” and “Pull” Factors (published in Viewpoints Special Edition, Migration and the Mashreq, The Middle East Institute – Washington DC, April 2010, pp. 13 – 17.) Middle East Institute, Washington DC The earliest traces of modern Syro-Lebanese[1] migration date to the 1850s with Anthonius Al-Bishalani, who migrated to the United States. However, scholars consider the… Continue reading Lebanese Migration (1880–Present): “Push” and “Pull” Factors